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Thread: THE OLD MUSIC THREAD OMNIBUS -- NO ROCK AND ROLLERS ALLOWED UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCE!!!!!!

  1. #201
    Oliphaunt Jizzelbin's avatar
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    Mister.......TAM....BOURINE......MAN!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!

    Yeah, I didn't think Shatner could out-Shatner himself, but he did it. I wonder about what he was thinking, except maybe earning his paunch the honest way, through lots of fattening...drugs or something. What an odd man.

    NO! I refuse to listen to the Nimoy "Ballad of Bilbo Baggins" again, although that was a worthy retort. Perhaps this thread will scare some kids straight and keep them off the living nightmare of horrid novelty recordings.

    On the Good hand, some van drivers at work at 0 dark thirty were rapping on the old tune "Thunderbird" (you know, "What's the price? Sixty twice!" (Although I prefer "cut it twice," but it's just an old tune with made-up words).

    My mobile connection is running slow, but I must put in a plug for James Booker's "Wine Spo-de-Odee" from the Maple Leaf recording in NOLA. Solo piano, solo singing. Yeah, he doesn't say "Wine motherfucker drinkin' wine!" which I guess was the original hobo/ghetto version and the one I like to sing, but that performance opened my ears to how much crazy can be combined with real music. In G IIRC.

  2. #202
    Oliphaunt Jizzelbin's avatar
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    Oh, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sFjTz68F-P4]Here 'tis, to borrow a phrase from IIRC a Junior Mance piano album

    I forgot Booker's version begins with a little bit of Allen Toussaint's tune "Life." I don't think he had a hit with that one as a songwriter or producer (I think Dr. John covered it on one of his Toussaint-produced albums, but I don't remember).

    I do recall the tune.....I learned it in D, and it's kind of a nice finger-stretching exercise for piano in LH. Kind of rotates with the wrist up from the octave to the major tenth.

    But "Wine Spo-de-O-dee" — that was the one that I turned my friends onto around age 19-20 or so and turned everyone's heads.

  3. #203
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    OK, fine. Well allow me to retort: https://youtu.be/Ls42F23V6rQ

    No. That's not good. I can listen to Nimoy's baritone all day before that one. Plus, I fucking hate the Beatles.

    OK, just the classic. It's a good tune about a man they call rocket. A classic in the horrid novelty genre, I'd say. For old time's sake.

    But the James Booker "Wine Spo-de-odee" is really good — I think music lovers will appreciate how Booker seamlessly uses some musicianship/tricks and has mastered the "art" of flowing from one tune to the next.

    Anyway, that's when I was eighteen or nineteen or so I learned how to "mix" tunes, sort of like a DJ, but while actually playing in real-time. Seminal.
    Last edited by Jizzelbin; 31 Jan 2019 at 08:03 AM.

  4. #204
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    All right, I have to put a plug in for Dr. John's classic roots-R&B album Gumbo.

    A few things I noticed after not having heard this in a while (incidentally, this album is where I learned a lot of these tunes on piano, and prompted me to learn from the original Huey Smith albums, and Eddie Bo, and everybody).

    (i) The isolated piano segments at the beginning and especially the end of some of the tunes are a treasure trove. If I were smarter back then I would have just made a loop of those on my open-reel 1/4" tape.

    (ii) Even though I still only play "Stagolee" the way the Doctor does on piano (you know, just I like to pay tribute and I don't really have much reason to play the tune except for laughs), I never really heard his version of the lyrics.

    I find it interesting that StaggerLee is pretty much the hero in Mac's lyrics. Just one of those tunes where you just make some words up that sort of rhyme and something you heard in the back of the mind, at least for me.

    Contrast that with like Professor's version which IIRC is a lot more like the way I've heard it more often, like Billy Lyon talking about his sickly wife and children.

    So, I guess after almost twenty-five years of hearing and studying this album in particular, I finally got around to noticing the lyrics in this version.

    And that is no shit — I distinctly remember actually writing out in pencil and staff paper the piano part to that tune and some of the others. Probably still around here someplace.

    I guess people have different priorities with the music — it's kind of nice to have the lyrics with the music too.

    Not too nice, but it's a little bit extra.

    ETA

    (a) No, I don't have a link. Just go buy the CD. It's on the Atlantic/Atco label or that whole thing. It's probably twelve dollars. Twenty-five years, almost exactly, and the redbook original CD still spins perfectly.

    (b) Some new refreshers I was glad to hear. I still play these myself just on piano, but "Blow, Wind Blow" (cover of the Fats Domino hit) is outstanding, and there are a few subtle arrangement/additions on piano I never noticed before. Nothing new I can recall about "Somebody Changed the Locks," but

    aw, shit, just the whole album is great. As you know, or should know, or will know. Start to finish feel-good music. Terrific horns, like somebody legend like Red Tyler on tenor or somebody heavy, exceptional (truly, I don't know if it was John Boudreaux, but it was somebody heavy) drums, and the bassist is great, probably DI into tape through the console. Impeccable sound. Mixed terrifically. Whatsisface, Ronny Barron? Anyway, some kid on Hammond organ backing the Doctor's piano up. I believe it's probably Mac playing the guitar solo on "Let the Good Times Roll," which isn't half bad.
    Last edited by Jizzelbin; 31 Jan 2019 at 07:42 PM.

  5. #205
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    Die Krähe sung by an apparently well-known tenor named Hans Hotter.

    Never heard of him, but apparently he was a big deal in Wagner opera, but to my ear doesn't sound like a Heldentenor.

    I do wish I had had the means to buy a score of the Winterreise of Schubert, instead of using photocopies, back when I did a little one-off piano performance of maybe eight or ten of the songs in in the cycle. Now, it doesn't matter, but it would have been nice to have a little record of my pencil markings. Obviously, this particular piece doesn't need the score, since it can be played by ear, at least close enough.

    This performance is quite a bit slower than others I've heard.

    But, for all I know about singing (which is nothing), that guy has some power behind the voice.

    And, instead of older recordings of people like Melchior, the sound quality is listenable. IMHO.
    Last edited by Jizzelbin; 09 Feb 2019 at 03:47 PM.

  6. #206
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    Here's an extraordinary instrumental-only version of the old "classic" tune "Fly Like An Eagle."

    Yeah, I know.

    But it's a very good look at how the Hammond organ is used in rock music.

    As much as I love Rick Wright's playing for that guy Pink Floyd, here it's easy to hear how the organist is using the two manuals (one has the "percussion" effect applied, the other doesn't) as well as the "expression" pedal and changing the speed of the Leslie speaker/different depths of the "chorus" effect.

    I hate this song, but it's a great example of just hearing how the backing tracks are played — IOW, we keyboard players aren't just sitting on our fat asses hiding behind a stack of keyboards.

    No comment on the synth "contribution" towards the end.

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