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Thread: Omnibus movies Q&A thread including trivia

  1. #751
    Oliphaunt Jizzelbin's avatar
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    Well, trying to "get it up" to go to "work" this AM, the opening party scene of Nichols' The Graduate is about...it's well-written, but Nichols' or his cameraman had it about perfect.

    This is a stage play filmed with the sensibility of a director.

    I still think the opening party scene is a motherfucker.

    I suspect that many people with degrees on paper can relate to Benjamin (Dustin Hoffman).

  2. #752
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    The "movie" The Rum Diary, based off a bit of juvenalia of Hunter S. T(can't remember how to spell his last name, anyway, the justly famous writer and thinker).

    Oh, God.

    I've seen this a few times, but never before have I seen the seams of the tapestry laid so bare.

    And this is one time I'm pretty sure I'm not wrong.

    It doesn't mean it's a bad movie, but when you can tell what order in which scene or scenes were filmed...to me, it's distracting.

    I don't know anything about the above-the-line budget or whatever, but I think the editor gets a bad thumbs down.

    The heart and the acting, though, I still like. To me, many parts of the narrative are like things very familiar. AFAIC the parts I can see are very true to a kind of romantic idea.

    Unfortunately, it wasn't put together all that good.

    ETA IOW, it was a good movie, but it was wrecked by the Movieola. They had all the film, some of the sound, but not much of the craft in the small back room.

    EETA And, yes, the tapestry metaphor is meant to refer the reader to Sartre's Qu'est-ce que la littérature? I won't call it facile, but that's IME how one could call seeing the "art" behind the seams. No, I'm not going to look up a nice quote — it's an idea, not a quote.
    Last edited by Jizzelbin; 30 Nov 2018 at 11:59 PM.

  3. #753
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    Ah. Good old favorite, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.

    Yeah, I don't really have much of a comment, except when the photographer enters the hotel room about twenty-one minutes or so.

    No, I never saw the movie while under any influence except some wine and tobacco, but nothing like a good acid flashback.

    Shit. I always thought that was just an urban legend housewives told their teenage kids.

    Yeah, well, just....don't do drugs.

    I think that's the point of the movie.

    Maybe the book too.

    ETA Oh no. I can't watch any more of this. It's not a movie for watching, unless you like hallucinating bugs in your hair....no. Can't be watched, unless you're in that state of mind. For the one thing, it's REALLY loud. Terrible sound mixer.

    What's better now to watch?

    Shit, I don't know. Maybe a Joel-era MST3K.
    Last edited by Jizzelbin; 01 Dec 2018 at 04:37 AM.

  4. #754
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    Try these on for size. My latest five:

    Limitless
    Rewatched this Bradley Cooper/Robert De Niro technothriller and enjoyed it all over again. Smart, well-acted, engaging, suspenseful and with some subtle but very effective sfx. One of my favorite movies of this century.

    Hello, Dolly!
    Having just seen a touring company of the show, I decided to check out the movie. A bit stale but fun. Barbra Streisand carries the film and sings her heart out; Walter Matthau is his usual imperious, grumpy self.

    Needful Things
    So-so adaptation of the Stephen King book, about an evil, scheming shopkeeper who turns the people of a small Maine town murderously against each other.

    The Nice Guys
    Russell Crowe and Ryan Gosling are pretty good as a pair of mismatched private eyes in Seventies L.A., looking for the missing daughter of a top Justice Department official (Kim Basinger). Could've been better, but worth a look.

    Deadpool
    Rewatched this ultraviolent, very funny, super raunchy, fourth-wall-breaking anti-superhero action movie. Really good stuff.
    Last edited by Elendil's Heir; 04 Dec 2018 at 04:49 PM.

  5. #755
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    Its been a while since I contributed.

    Bought and watched Incredibles 2: not as good as the first, but the first was a perfect movie, this was a very good movie.

    Watched Miracle on 34th Street the other night. I love this movie. It is my favorite Christmas movie

    The Bishop's Wife starring Cary Grant, David Niven and Loretta Young. A good movie, Cary Grant was stretching out of his more common screwball comedy lead in this one. James Gleason is also in it and is great as always. One of the great old character actors.

    The Light Between Oceans 2016 was pretty meh. It is not bad, but I wouldn't recommend it.

  6. #756
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    My latest five:

    She Wore a Yellow Ribbon
    A 1949 John Wayne movie about an aging cavalry officer on his last mission (or is it?) in the 1870s American West, trying to avert a new war with the Indians. Another of his problems is that two of his young officers are both wooing the same spunky Western gal. Recommended to me by a friend; it was OK but not great.

    Good Bye, Lenin!
    Comedy about a young East German man who goes to great lengths to keep his mother, who was in a coma when the Berlin Wall fell, from learning that communism has failed and the Soviet bloc has collapsed. Funny and oddly touching.

    The Bad News Bears
    The 1976 original, with Walter Matthau as the grumpy, alcoholic coach of a struggling Little League team and Tatum O'Neal as his star pitcher. A sports comedy which has its moments but just hasn't aged well.

    The Wolverine
    Logan goes to Japan to say goodbye to the former Japanese officer, now a wealthy industrialist, whom he saved during WWII. Interesting plot, fine cast, and some great action sequences.

    Dave
    Probably my all-time favorite political comedy! Kevin Kline is terrific as a look-alike for the President who has to pretend to be him, and discovers that he kind of likes the job; Sigourney Weaver is equally good as the First Lady who starts to realize that all is not as it seems. Frank Langella steals every scene he's in and really should've won an Oscar as the hard-nosed, power-hungry White House chief of staff. Charles Grodin is also great as the CPA whom the fake President brings in to balance the Federal budget. Highly recommended.

  7. #757
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    Just re-watched little known Christmas Heist movie Fitzwilly (1967) starring Dick Van Dyke, Barbara Feldon (agent 99) and Dame Edith Evans.

    It is a fun, well paced comedy. The stars are great in their roles and Dick Van Dyke shows off his "Worst English Accent ever" briefly again.

  8. #758
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    Killing time before going to work, I put on All That Jazz — you know, I've seen this a few times but I forgot or didn't notice the Lenny Bruce material near the beginning.

    Obviously, Bob Fosse and Lenny (sp?) Bruce had some connection, you know, with the docudrama (which I don't remember, I think I saw Fosse's movie when I was twelve, rented from the library).

    Yeah, to me this is a kind of Christmas movie, I suppose, although I don't have time to watch the whole movie again.

    Roy Scheider, like Dustin Hoffman, sort of great screen icons although you always sort of wonder how they got that "stage presence" in front of the camera.

    Whatever they did (in very distinct careers), they did very well IMHO.

  9. #759
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    I like Roy Scheider as an actor, not great, but very good.

    Dustin Hoffman is mostly Dustin Hoffman and his appeal has worn thin for me.

  10. #760
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    Quote Originally posted by Elendil's Heir View post
    She Wore a Yellow Ribbon
    A 1949 John Wayne movie about an aging cavalry officer on his last mission (or is it?) in the 1870s American West, trying to avert a new war with the Indians. Another of his problems is that two of his young officers are both wooing the same spunky Western gal. Recommended to me by a friend; it was OK but not great.
    Well. That's just like your opinion, man.

    I think in Ford's movies, particularly of the cavalry "trilogy," a lot of the delight is in the disjointed piecing-together of classic "moments."

    Yeah, each individual film of Ford, especially when these are movies in the canon, may not hold together so much in terms of logic or more than a loose plot and many, many indulgences given by Ford to things he liked (actors, lines of dialogue, scenery), but I think that's part of Ford's charm in his movies — he didn't care so much, it seems to me, about making every little thing fit in, like a puzzle.

    He wanted the big picture, so to speak. Such that I don't disbelieve that anecdote of him just yanking random pages out of the script and saying to the production chief, "Hey, that short enough for you?"

    But also the small moments, the little scenes of dialogue with his trusty band of actor accomplices.

    He wasn't a "medium-scale" craftsman like Howard Hawks, IMHO — he had two "speeds." Big and small.

    Cum grano salis should be taken — I haven't read a lot about Ford from "scholars," just my impression.

    ETA
    Quote Originally posted by Jizzelbin
    Well. That's just like your opinion, man.
    Oh, sorry, that should have been "That's just like your opinion, pilgrim!"
    Last edited by Jizzelbin; 25 Dec 2018 at 12:31 PM.

  11. #761
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    For me the masterpieces of John Ford are Mister Roberts, The Quiet Man & The Grapes of Wrath in that order.

  12. #762
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    I did not know Ford directed Mister Roberts — it appears he did indeed, although I see he became ill and had someone take over.

    I guess I'd go for (top three) The Searchers, My Darling Clementine (tied with Young Mr. Lincoln), The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.

    Grapes of Wrath and Cheyenne Autumn — you know, call me ignorant, but there's something a little depressing about those movies.

  13. #763
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    I did not know Ford directed Mister Roberts — it appears he did indeed, although I see he became ill and had someone take over.

    I guess I'd go for (top three) The Searchers, My Darling Clementine (tied with Young Mr. Lincoln), The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.

    Grapes of Wrath and Cheyenne Autumn — you know, call me ignorant, but there's something a little depressing about those movies.

  14. #764
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    Quote Originally posted by Jizzelbin View post
    And straight-pool, pocketing the head ball (which is lying off somewhere random while the remaining 14 balls are racked up), while breaking up the remaining 14: it's hopeless for me. I can usually get the loose ball, or at least not scratch, but I don't have the knowledge of side-English to break up the remaining 14-ball cluster in the same shot.
    All right, first I have to clear this up. Now I've figured out all the side-English I need (ETA except for clearing up large clusters of balls and doing my mama proud and putting the one I called in the hole), but the ultimate challenge is smoothing out my stroke and controlling the speed.

    I don't mean "speed" like "show/hide your true speed," but getting the exact amount of speed on the cue + object ball to leave it in a nice place to just run out the table.

    I think I understand what some guy I was playing a few months ago was saying — lots of people hit hard on unknown barroom tables because the table's an unknown, so you try to overcome whatever faults there are. Not necessarily machismo thing.

    Oh, Barroom Hustlers is another pool-based movie I saw a long time ago, but I don't remember it as being good at all.

    But I wonder if WE? has any opinion about the modern classic movie The Last Detail.

    For some reason something reminded me of it...oh, it was this little "primer" on US ranks/rates and insignia, and it occurred to me I never remarked what Budowski and Mulhall (sp for both?) were in for as "lifers" and it made me think of movies, and, therefore, this thread.

    Pay in mind I've seen this movie probably as much or more than any other, but it just never occurred to me to look at the two principals' shoulder/sleeve.

    I do like that moment when Budowski is getting called up to meet the XO (?) and he swishes around some Night Train in his mouth and spits it out.

    That's called not giving a fuck, in my book.

    EETA Oh, I gave one of the LOTR movies another chance: The Return of the King. I thought it was an exceptional piece of narrative, and a spectacular piece of film-making. No, beyond seeing the first two movies of the trilogy before, I have very little understanding of the details, but even if I were to have gone in "fresh-faced," I still think it would have engaged me and most anyone.

    It was a complete movie, IMHO, with all the elements in place.

    I say it can be allowed.
    Last edited by Jizzelbin; 28 Dec 2018 at 01:51 AM.

  15. #765
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    All right, speaking of Dustin Hoffman, I tried to sit through the remake of Straw Dogs a second time.

    No, fucking way.

    That is a fucking horrible movie.

    At least in his prime Dustin Hoffman could sell a movie character — I don't know what happened (although Rain Man is good because his character is easy to impersonate), but this fucking remake is the biggest pile of shit you'd never want to swallow.

    At least the real Straw Dogs had some actual actors in it, and Dustin Hoffman wasn't some pussy little writer, and Susan George was believable as a somewhat toothless bumpkin from Wales, or wherever.

    ETA and Roger Ebert sucks cocks in hell for "preferring" it to the original. That fat fuck.
    Last edited by Jizzelbin; 28 Dec 2018 at 02:15 AM.

  16. #766
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    [QUOTE=Jizzelbin;321374]
    Quote Originally posted by Jizzelbin View post
    ...

    But I wonder if WE? has any opinion about the modern classic movie The Last Detail.

    For some reason something reminded me of it...oh, it was this little "primer" on US ranks/rates and insignia, and it occurred to me I never remarked what Budowski and Mulhall (sp for both?) were in for as "lifers" and it made me think of movies, and, therefore, this thread.

    Pay in mind I've seen this movie probably as much or more than any other, but it just never occurred to me to look at the two principals' shoulder/sleeve.

    ...

    EETA Oh, I gave one of the LOTR movies another chance: The Return of the King. I thought it was an exceptional piece of narrative, and a spectacular piece of film-making. No, beyond seeing the first two movies of the trilogy before, I have very little understanding of the details, but even if I were to have gone in "fresh-faced," I still think it would have engaged me and most anyone.

    It was a complete movie, IMHO, with all the elements in place.

    I say it can be allowed.
    The Last Detail is a movie I watch once long ago at this point. I don't remember have much of an opinion on it. I looked at some imaged from the film and Jack's character is a signalman based on his sleeve rating. 1st class Petty officer, which usually means at least plans to be a 20 year man.
    I couldn't make out a clear image of his partner's sleeve.

    ROTK is pretty good, suffers a little from too many endings fatigue and I wish the Scouring of the Shire had been filmed.

  17. #767
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    I saw The Last Detail not long ago and thought it was just OK. A downbeat movie about burned-out Navy guys just trying to have a good time on a shitty assignment.

    I agree about ROTK. I think Fellowship is a much better movie, and probably the best of the trilogy, even though each of them have some memorable moments.

    My latest five:

    A Christmas Story
    I'd never actually seen the movie all the way through, so I finally did. A funny, sentimental holiday movie about growing up poor but loved in an oddball family during the Great Depression.

    The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
    The Coen Brothers' new Western anthology. "The Meal Ticket," about an unusual orator and his rough-hewn impresario, is the best segment, I think, but the whole movie is pretty good - fun, imaginative, and often quirky, violent and dark in that patented CB way. An outstanding ensemble cast including Liam Neeson, James Franco, Stephen Root, Brendan Gleeson and others.

    Die Hard
    Still not a "Christmas movie," dammit, but an exciting, action-packed thriller that just happens to be set at Christmastime. Probably the third or fourth time I've seen it. As great as ever.

    Georgia O'Keeffe
    Biopic with Joan Allen in the title role as the iconoclastic painter, and Jeremy Irons as her lover, promoter and eventual husband, the photographer Alfred Stieglitz. An interesting and engaging portrait of two remarkably talented people and their tumultuous, sometimes love-hate relationship.

    White Christmas
    Hadn't seen this holiday classic before, either. Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye put together a big show to save the failing Vermont inn of their former WWII commanding officer. Dated and silly, sometimes even cringeworthy, but has some good songs.

  18. #768
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    I don't know about you guys: to me The Last Detail is an absolute modern classic, with superb acting.

    The editing choices (I assume were made by the director) in certain places of sort of blending together pieces of time into mini-vignettes (that's like a small little vignette, I guess), irritate me, but I don't think any of the three principals ever did anything better. Otis Young, certainly, I don't know him from anything else. And Randy Quaid's only other "quality" role was The Last Picture Show, and it was a minor role. He was perfect in this, though. And while Jack had a number of choice roles in the 1970s, he never did anything better IMHO. As good, but not better.

    Not a real tightly scripted movie, but if you like the voyeuristic experience of seeing some dudes doing some stuff, I'll defend it.

    ROTK, I agree, it does have that ending that just goes on and on, with some little maps and shit, and tying up the framing device. But at least the advantage is I don't have to be committed to the whole "ZOMG Ian Holm and there's that tall guy with the weird pipe" and all the ridiculous antics about finding taverns and inns and stuff.

    I guess it's the movie of the trilogy for people who don't care about the books, and just want a kind of neat action movie.

    So, for me, it works on that level.
    Last edited by Jizzelbin; 30 Dec 2018 at 05:30 PM.

  19. #769
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    Oh, and thanks WE? for the clarification about ratings/rank and such. Yeah, I got that Jack's character was a signalman, but I wouldn't have been able to figure out 1st class petty officer.

    Buddusky (Jack) looked about to the end of his twenty years, I suppose — say he enlisted at eighteen, and he didn't look a day under thirty-seven in the movie.

    I think from Wikipedia I saw Otis Young's character was a gunner's mate (hey, wasn't that the MOS of ... Chef [or one of them, anyway] from Apocalypse Now? except in the Army in that movie)....Wait a minute, no, that was a Navy boat the Army Capt. was riding on, so same deal.

    I wonder how come the signalman got to be the "honcho" on the "detail" — I'd have guessed the gunner's mate was more skilled or had a higher rank.

    AND is "honcho" a real term from the USN, or just some bit of slang (Robt Towne, I think) invented for the movie? Yes, I know it's a real term in English, but you probably know better than anybody that some terms become terms of art in certain trades and disciplines.

    "Do you know why these men are taking you to the brig? Because they're mean sons of bitches when they want to be, and they always want to be!"
    Last edited by Jizzelbin; 30 Dec 2018 at 07:29 PM.

  20. #770
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    Well, aside from all that, I'll still put in a plug for the HBO documentary about James Brown, Mr. Dynamite.

    I believe Jabo the drummer died not too long ago, so I suppose it's not too big a stretch to bring up this, IMO, incredible documentary again. Clyde Stubblefield died a few years ago, so it goes double for him.

    Yeah, for me, when I hear the JBs, and the classics like "Cold Sweat," and so on, it kind of inspires me a bit.

    Maybe Mr. Brown was not a model citizen in all ways, but I think he played his role in a way which inspires. Ruthless, brutal, but also a leader and model for many people, especially in the U.S.

    ETA Also, you all are a bunch of fruits for not liking The Last Detail.

    EETA And Die Hard occurs during Advent, I think. So, technically not Christmas. I can't remember. Anyway, Merry Christmas, since 'tis the season. Pro-tip: greet people with "Merry Christmas" until at least Epiphany — they love it.
    Last edited by Jizzelbin; 30 Dec 2018 at 10:57 PM.

  21. #771
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    I should clear up, or perhaps ask for clarification on what I mean when I say a movie is "too loud."

    In music audio, that would be the job of the mastering engineer. They're the guys or gals who use very finely-calibrated, usually hardware, compression tools, and maybe use a very precise notch EQ to clean up some oversights of the mixer.

    In film, the only person I know personally is this guy — I've seen his studio, friend of family, and so forth. I could probably ask him, but I don't know him that well and haven't seen him in twenty years.

    But it does seem to me that the term "sound designer" is better suited for the person who should take the blame for irritations in audio in the movie.

    Unless I'm wrong, and I probably am, the sound mixer is analogous to an audio mixer technician/engineer.

    So, I'm going to go ahead and blame the "sound designer" for future aberrations.

    Actually, I might try to "friend" the above on FB and after the usual "how's your mom doing?" see if I can get a better answer. Were it not that my FB page is a mess and I have to carefully exclude people from seeing all my stuff except the basics.

  22. #772
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    ETA No, that's not right. The 5.1/7.1/whatever mixing engineer/technician should have all the responsibility for making the first pass acceptable. The sound designer/mastering engineer should bear some of the fault, since it's the final pass, but sometimes you can't do much when the stems you receive aren't mixed correctly.

    SO. I'm blaming the mixer, and then the director, and then the sound designer, in that order. Most of all the director, then the sound designer for not complaining about the shit audio tracks to the mix/sound engineer, then, reluctantly, the lowly mixer — meh, they can only do so much, and on a quick pace.

  23. #773
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    All right.

    Here's a little lagniappe, called Why Study Industrial Arts?

    You can skip all the robot crap in the beginning, but once the "film" starts playing, it's damned funny, I find.

  24. #774
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    Look for Randy Quaid in small but funny roles in What's Up, Doc? and Paper Moon, too.

    "Honcho" is a Japanese term originally meaning "squad leader": https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/honcho

    My latest five:

    Absolute Power
    So-so Clint Eastwood movie about a cat burglar who, while robbing a mansion, sees a woman killed in the President's presence by his Secret Service agents. The burglar decides to expose the crime while dodging assassins.

    Star Trek: The Motion Picture
    Hadn't seen this sf epic in awhile. Still pretty slow-paced, but an interesting story, beautiful score, and it's good to see the crew reunited on a spiffy, rebuilt starship.

    3 Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
    Dark comedy set in rural America, as a redneck mom tries to shame local cops into finding her daughter's killer and rapist. Excellent cast and funny dialogue, with a definite Coen-esque air.

    Six Shooter
    Oscar-winning Irish short film, with the always-great Brendan Gleeson as a grieving husband who takes a train ride he'll never forget.

    Ant-Man and the Wasp
    Another fun MCU superhero movie, and more light-hearted than most. Paul Rudd is again terrific as the everyman guy in the suit. Some fantastic chase sequences in San Francisco.

  25. #775
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    Aaaand my latest five:

    Seven Samurai
    Saw this Kurosawa classic for the first time, a B&W action movie about seven warriors defending a poor village from bandits. Overlong but worth a look.

    Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
    Terrific animated superhero movie, as Spider-folk from different universes team up to fight Kingpin and fix an interdimensional rift. Funny and exciting, with a beautiful mix of CGI and old-school animation. Really enjoyed it.

    Misery
    A famous writer, injured in a car crash on a lonely Colorado road, is held prisoner by his "Number One fan" and forced to write a novel bringing back the bodice-ripper heroine he has just recently, with great relief, killed off. Kathy Bates earned her Oscar as the mad, scary, controlling captor; James Caan is pretty good as the writer.

    Juno
    Offbeat comedy about a spunky pregnant teen who decides to give her unwanted baby to a young couple. Not as good as the reviews, I thought, although Ellen Page is adorkable in the lead role.

    The World Before Your Feet
    Very enjoyable documentary about a man who has the goal of walking all eight thousand miles of NYC's streets, boulevards and alleys. The movie takes you to parts of the city that you might never see otherwise, including a surprising number of green and unspoiled places.

  26. #776
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    Wow. Star Wars: Solo.

    That was really. Something.

    Kind of like a first-person shooter except instead of "you" being Solid Snake or Dutch Schwarzenegger. you're just some doughy guy who sort-of knows how to operate machinery and just otherwise has an ordinary day and meets some forgettable people, including some chicks he doesn't bone.

    Yeah, that was pretty...a movie, I guess, pretty much.

    It was pretty short, though, so that was neat.

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    First music cue from Seven Samurai. Never noticed that, I believe it was Dmitri Tiomkin who did the score for [i]Magn.Seven[/], "borrowed" that theme or "motif," as one chooses. Of course that particular motif uses the typically Eastern-Chinese microtonal intervals, but the mind is capable of resolving such pecularities, I find.

    OTOH, maybe I'm hallucinating, but I believe I can see the influence of Ford in the preference for close-quarters "intimate" scenes, as far down as the set design. Of course everyone knows Kurosawa made no bones about being a John Ford enthusiast, but I hadn't noticed such things before.

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